Week 11: Rule of Thirds | 2018 Project 52

This week’s composition of “rule of thirds” isn’t too difficult to implement, but I do hope that all the photographers following along challenged themselves to see how much it could impact an image. Even if it’s something as simple as shooting the same subject two different ways: centered and then with rule of thirds.

I wasn’t able to explore with my camera last week, but luckily I have two very adorable and cuddly models that are willing to pose for cookies.

All the cookies.

rule of thirds

Settings: f/3.2, 1/250 sec, 35mm, ISO 3200
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Canon EF35mm f/1.4L USM

I chose an image of Chevy, my BDD.

She plopped down, tossed back those ears in the “I’m here, what do you need” position and I snapped a few frames. I really love the directional light we get in our main room and I also like the pops of color with have with our area rug. With good light and interesting background, that big hairy face with brown eyes was positioned on the right 2/3 side of my view finder. A very simple image, but still one that I’ll keep forever.

She is so darn cute. And funny. And noisy. And smelly. So much BDD love.


Week 12: Rule of Odds
due 03.21.18

We’re half way through March and keeping up with our numbers theme for the month. Next week we’re focusing on another composition rule called “Rule of Odds.”

The rule of odds is new to me, but it makes sense. Essentially it is including an odd number of subjects in your image to make it more interesting. It’s suggested to choose at least three subjects. And since we’re keeping with odds, that’s three or five or seven… it might get a little difficult to keep up after that. But explore with the idea!

Would you like to shoot people and have three models? Set up a table scape or still life with an odd number of items? Take to the world outside and find something that fits the bill? Create a scene that has three different subjects but are related in a way? Whatever you want to do, let your heart lead and your brain take a back seat. And if you need some inspiration, there are some links below.

Rule of Odds
Understanding the Rule of Odds in Photography
The Odd Rule
Composition: Rule of Odds (Pinterest)

Last week’s photo: Two Subjects #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 10: Two Subjects | 2018 Project 52

To be honest, I wasn’t sure what I would do for “two subjects.” I had a lot of ideas, but nothing that wouldn’t require serious model work and posing… which are two things I don’t necessarily have time for right now. Bummer. But I decided to take my camera to work and walk out of the office with it around my neck on the way back to the car. A little shooting from the hip action.

I really like shooting from the hip because you never know what you’re going to get – your perspective changes with the frame lower, you have to stop down to keep more in focus, but have that shutter fast enough to keep the world from being blurred in your image. And sometimes you get lucky.

two subjects

Settings: f/6.3, 1/800 sec, 35mm, ISO 10K
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Canon EF35mm f/1.4L USM

I see the couple quite often after work. They either work together, or nearby, and carpool downtown. And no matter how many people are around, they hold hands on the way to their car.

Is this picture perfect? Hell no. But there’s a lot I like about it. I have two very clear to see subjects. The balance of color from my subjects’ clothes to the brighter ground. The lines of the sidewalk leading your eye further up the image. To where their hands meet and hold. Not perfect, but something that still makes me smile.


Week 11: Rules of Thirds
due 03.14.18

Most of us are familiar with the rule of thirds; it is a strong composition for any art that is simple to put into practice and apply. For those that don’t know it, imagine your viewfinder is split into nine cubes and you’re aligning your subject along the intersecting points. This simple composition trick can impact an image, a story, and the way a viewer interacts with your art.

So this week, we’re practicing our rule of thirds – horizontal or vertical – show us how you can flex these muscles.

Rule of Thirds
The Rule of Thirds in Photography
10 Myths About the Rule of Thirds

Last week’s photo: Wanderlust #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 9: Wanderlust | 2018 Project 52

We’ve had a crap ton of rain here in Kentucky the last month. So much so that a lot of Louisville is underwater – my drive to and from work has doubled because of all the detours everyone has to take and even some neighboring counties have closed school because getting out of neighborhoods has been bad. It’s been a doozie, that’s for a sure. And the Ohio River is only getting higher everyday.

The part of this is that the waterfalls behind out house are flowing.

I took a nature walk the other day when the rain decided to stop. Everything else was sopping mess, but I armed myself in rain boots and my camera and headed out. The waterfalls were gorgeous and the sound of water is the best. I explored the area for about 30 minutes and experimented with shutter speed before I headed back home. And crossed my fingers that something turned out to be good enough.

wanderlust

Settings: f/4.0, 1/400 sec, 35mm, ISO 250
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Canon EF35mm f/1.4L USM

All I wanted was a photo that invited the viewer in. One that I would look at say to myself “I want to be there” or “this makes me want to explore.” So it’s no surprise that I chose the widest shot I had of one of the waterfalls.

Things I like about this picture: The layering with the mossy rock. Being able to look upstream. To see all the “rapid” water heading my way. That I really do want to step inside the image.

Things I don’t like about this picture: The fact that I couldn’t position myself better without possibly harming myself. Those damn twigs that are out of focus so effing annoying.

But I did like being out in the woods by myself. One of these days I’m going to wade in and get a fabulous photo of this little waterfall from the water… but it was too deep and moving a bit too fast for me to feel comfortable doing that. And it was cold. But I did get some other photos from my little adventure that might create wanderlust for others.

I really love photographing moss. The texture, the way light hits it… I’m obsessed.

This leafy photo is my favorite from the day. So simple and too detailed for the prompt.


Week 10: Two Subjects
due 03.07.18

This week we’re kicking off a series of composition challenges that revolve around numbers – and we’re starting with “two subjects.” Most of our images have one subject that we’re focused on, but this week we’re going to incorporate TWO subjects, both of which as essential parts of the story you’re telling with your photo. The subjects can go together or be juxtaposition, but together create a stronger image and anecdote for the viewer.

I have a few articles below to help us explore the idea of two subjects, this one by Eric Kim is my favorite. Kim shows us why multiple subjects can be interesting in photography and he also teaches us that balance is really important for more than subject. Even if you don’t read the article, look a the pictures. Stop and think “What makes this interesting? Is there more than one story here?” before scrolling down to see how Kim dissects the image. Let’s see if we can step out of comfort zone and get creative… if not, let’s just find a way to work two subjects into one frame.

Street Photography Composition: Multiple Subjects
Photography Composition: Creating Visual Tension with Two Subjects (YouTube)
10 Tips on How to Create Juxtaposition in Your Photography
28 Examples of Juxtaposition in Photography

Last week’s photo: Grain #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 8: Grain | 2018 Project 52

I’m back on the struggle bus this week. All of my brain power is going to project management and I have none left over to get creative with this project. It makes me sad… but my job has been so rewarding the last few weeks. Gah. But I took advantage of the low light of February the best way I knew how to: I got in front of the camera.

Not at all what I wanted for this week. But this is what I walked away with. Sometimes you win, and sometimes you deal with what you’ve got.

grain

Settings: f/13.0, 1/20 sec, 35mm, ISO 10K
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Canon EF35mm f/1.4L USM

I tried a few things. I knew I needed low light so I increased my aperture, bumped the ISO and closed the curtains. I did some poses looking at the camera… but good golly was I feeling fowl and the serious look on my face could make a ghost boo hoo. I was not pleased with those, I so decided to slow down the shutter speed and see if a little movement would wake up the frame a bit.

My hair and sweater kind of blend in together, but I do like the movement of my hair, how my face is hidden. And I definitely added more grain in post processing because even at 10K ISO, it wasn’t what I thought it should be.

So… this week isn’t a fave. But I came in at the last-minute and made my own deadline. I hope next week I can get out into the fresh air and feel like a stranger in my home town.


Week 9: Wanderlust
due 02.28.18

#Wanderlust has become a popular hashtag on Instagram the last few years. But the definition of wanderlust is the desire to travel. Even if many of us don’t travel (or are home-bodies), there’s something about the idea of getting away to some place magical. A place that fills us with peace or makes us breathe it in. To either be surrounded by people or alone on a mountaintop. And #wanderlust is all about stepping into that scene you picture.

While most of us are not traveling this week, I challenge you to go out into the world and photograph things with a new eye. Whatever you’re experiencing, is there a way to make it first person, or entice the viewer in a way that makes them want to jump in the frame with you? Go outside, take a photowalk, visit somewhere you’ve never been, keep your viewfinder to your eye… get weird and shoot with your heart.

Some inspiration for your eyes (and heart):
#wanderlust on Instagram
15 Wanderlust Inspiring Photos
Stock Photography Wanderlust Search
500px Wanderlust Photos

Last week’s photo: Mirror Reflection #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 7: Mirror Reflection | 2018 Project 52

When I think of “mirror reflection” I immediately imagine a beautiful building, or mountain, reflecting perfectly in still water. Every time I see these types of images, I stare longer. Because the likelihood of me ever capturing one is like… super slim.

I had to get creative this week. I knew I’d end up working inside instead of exploring. And I knew that I’d have a lack of time and daylight – even with the days getting a little longer, I’ve been putting in more hours at work. More hours means when I have time at home… I do nothing. Double-edged sword. But all that thinking really hard and putting in the time wears me out both mentally and physically. Luckily I kind of had an idea of what to try at home.

mirror reflection

Settings: f/2.8, 1/200 sec, 70mm, ISO 10K
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

Inspired by curves picture from #2017project52, I created subject from card stock and then threw a large mirror I had on top of our guest bed. I tested different light, but the natural light from the window was my favorite… even if I was at 10K ISO. And the lower aperture softened the curves and knocked out the background more. A simple way to achieve a mirror reflection.

I really do like the movement and the bright orange – it reminds me of macro photos of flowers or seeds. And how the reflection is a bit a fuzzy… I actually like it. What I don’t like is the background with that line across the back – I couldn’t figure out how to knock it out more and I am not that good at editing, so it remains and bugs me. Oh well.


Week 8: Grain
due 02.21.18

Let’s embrace the grain this week!

Grain, those little textured dots that you sometimes see in images, was much more common with film photography. Film speed, combined with available light, would determine how much grain you’d see in your photos. With digital photography, this began to disappear. We now use ISO to help us control the light coming into our cameras; the higher the ISO, the more noise (or grain) we see in our final images. But cameras have gotten so good at diminishing noise, we actually see people adding it back in post-production.

So let’s explore grain, noise, whatever you want to call. Boost your ISO, shoot in lower light, or add it back in post-production, but think about how having grain present in your photo can help tell your story. I think my favorite message I found this week was the reminder that “imperfection is beauty” in an article from Erik Kim. So find something inspiring and beautiful around you and see if grain changes the way you look at it.

Last week’s photo: Layering #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!