Week 28: Local | 2018 Project 52

The holiday had me bouncing around a bit, but I knew what – and where – I wanted to take my picture this week.

Just leave it to me, to forget my lunch and my camera this week. Luckily I have this phone…

localSettings: auto –  f/1.7, 1/60 sec, 4.25mm, ISO 80
Camera and Lens: Samsung Galaxy s8

One of my favorite areas in Louisville is NULU. A stretch of local eats and boutiques and few bars down Market Street near downtown. I’ve been down this street hundreds of times. I’ve eaten at the restaurants – well, some of them. I’ve shopped on the stores – well, kind of. But I’ve seen all the window displays – meh, not really. Story short? There’s always something new to explore. Even if the shops and restaurants stay the same, the things the offer and the people who visit are ever-changing.

This was my choice this week. I love the all the dinosaur planters, the bright colors, the “handmade local awesome” sign, the dog peaking around the corner… it’s weird and it’s fabulous and it’s 100% local Louisville. But I also like the reflection in the window, the hint of something new. Ghyslain, a local French patisserie, closed not too long and even though I hadn’t been in years, I suddenly miss it so much more. I can still taste their sweet, sweet chocolate croissants and gruyere paninis… *drool*

Not a special picture. But it shows a bit of home, our personality… how homey and quirky we are and even how much we are changing. Louisville’s been my home for years and it will stay that – it’s my little piece of paradise.


Week 29: Kinetic Photography
due 07.18.18

Speaking of weird, are you all ready to try something completely odd?

We’re back to experimental techniques, this week we are tossing our cameras – not away, but into the air. Yikes.

Kinetic photography is influenced by the motions made with your camera – similar to intentional camera movement (ICM), but different as in your camera is tossed into the air with an open shutter and creating something wild and interesting. Or… trying to at least. So if you don’t have use a camera strap, I suggest you use one this week. Or if you’re too afraid to explore this technique, improvise how you see fit: you can use your phone camera, use an older camera, create a soft landing area, barely let go… what ever feels comfortable to you.

This is new to me so I’ve linked some resources below for us to look into, and some examples are include too. Have fun, find some lights to shoot with at night or step outside with the sun is fading, let that long shutter stay open and share your favorite for the week!

Kinetic Photography: Techniques and Stunning Examples
Beautiful Examples of Kinetic Photography
25 Great Examples of the Camera Toss
Kinetic Photography (Flicker)

Last Week’s photo: Sunburst #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

wendipants - Love, love, love this. I’m especially intrigued about how your reflection in the shop window just melts away.

Week 27: Sunburst | 2018 Project 52

Waiting until the last-minute was not working for me this week. Mostly because there was no sun. Ugh. But I have a photo…

sunburst

Settings: auto –  f/1.7, 1/22K sec, 4.25mm, ISO 50
Camera and Lens: Samsung Galaxy s8

… and it sucks.

I didn’t have it in me this week. No inspiration. No motivation. No energy. No cares, to be honest. But I do have a photo. Taken before clouds and storms moved in for two days.

This funk needs to go, that’s for sure.


Week 28: Local
due 07.11.18

“Pertaining to a city, town, or small district rather than an entire state or country.”

Show us a bit of the town or city around you. It can be your favorite place or a completely new-to-you area, but take a tour with your camera and share something about the place you call home.

If you’re up for more of a challenge, tell a story with your image. Think of ways to include people and make composition stronger so that it really captures the narrative of your home town.

Last Week’s photo: Photographer’s Choice #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 26: Photographer’s Choice | 2018 Project 52

I had great plans this weekend with friends and parties and children and food and jewelry and I took no pictures. Ugh.

I usually snap a few frames when we visit with our college friends, and especially when there are birthday candles to blow out… but I was not feeling it. (Being sprayed by water may have been a turnoff too. So I tucked my camera somewhere safe instead of in my hands.) But all this laziness amounts to is another Tuesday night of scratching my head and thinking “oh what shall I ever take a picture of?!”

What is photographer’s choice the hardest prompt for me?

macro photography

Settings: f/–, 1/125 sec, 50mm, ISO 400
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Canon EF50mm f/1.2L USM

I love Queen Anne’s lace. I know it’s wild and always has bugs, but they have always caught my eye. And I saw a few that hadn’t been mowed yet in the empty lot across the street, so I picked a few and then went inside. Bug-free, I might add.

I had a large, open flower. Some small buds that were tight little balls. And quite a few in between the two. But this one, which is half-opened, is my favorite.

I went macro with this shot, using my 50mm lens turned around, kind of free-lensing and moving my body to find a focus that worked well. (Also known as “holding my breath and barely moving my arms.”) And this photo right here, where the depth of field is at such a perfect spot that part of the flower disappears, leaving little clusters of tiny flowers floating in the air. Magic.


Week 27: Sunburst
due 07.04.18

I’m all about light and keep trying to learn as much as I can about it. How to find it, manipulate it, explore it… and this week we’re all about having the light work for us. Let’s find or create a sunburst, some dazzling and blazing streaks of light and rainbows!

I challenge you to shoot outdoors in full sun and explore your environment by changing your perspective constantly. Sometimes when we shoot into the sun we end up some unwanted lens flare, but try positioning your camera in different ways or even using a prop to help you get the sunburst exactly how you want it. If daytime isn’t an option for you, it can be done at night, but you’ll have to change the settings of your camera and experiment a bit more.

This is not a technique familiar to me – it mostly happens on accident if I’m being completely honest here – so I did link up some resources below for us to read through before we stretch our photography brains this week.

How to Get “Sunburst” in Landscape Photography
Using Sun Flares and Starbursts to Create Stunning Images
Create Compelling Star Effects… or Diffraction Spikes in Your Photographs
How to Get Sunbursts in Photos
5 Steps to Creating a Starburst Effect Day or Night
Understanding Camera Lens Flare
What is Lens Flare and How to Fix It

Last Week’s photo: Curves #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 25: Curves | 2018 Project 52

I was the worst at trying to find curves this week. I looked everywhere, but NEVER FOUND THEM. I was that weirdo that was bending down to look under sloping branches, peeping through holes in furniture to see if anything was nicely framed… nothing came from it.

I was on my last leg, walking around the house Tuesday evening, praying to find something that would fit into this theme when… the Cornflake the Cat didn’t follow me. Finally.

curves

Settings: f/3.5, 1/400 sec, 54mm, ISO 320
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

Truth be told, I have another image I like a lot more than this one, but it plays into our curves theme perfectly and I decided to choose it instead. (Or purr-fectly. Whatever floats your boat.)

Cornflake is my shadow when I’m outside and I usually can’t even get a good picture of him with my phone because of all the rubbing and purring that’s going on. But he sat still. Long enough for me to snap a couple of frames.

Things I like about this image: the curved line leads your from the bottom of the image to the cat, the contrast between light and dark, and the negative space. And, of course, Cornflake.

Things I don’t like about this image: It feels a bland. I know the curved line is here but… it doesn’t tell a story. Blah.

There’s always next week, and the week after that, to practice storytelling though. That’s the great thing about a weekly project: you win some, you lose some, but you’re always learning – if not about photography, then about yourself.


Week 26: Photographer’s Choice
due 06.27.18

It’s that time again… where another quarter has come and gone… it’s time for a wild card week. Thank goodness.

So anything goes this week – you find your inspiration, be it light, a certain person or place, a special story… share it with us. I challenge you to shoot with your heart this week – step out of yourself, our of your head, and let your eyes and emotions lead you. Trust that you’ll end up with an amazing photograph. I think you will. I know you will. Be true to who you are, what you like and express yourself.

The only rule is to pick your favorite and ONLY SHARE ONE IMAGE in the #2018P52 Flickr group. It can be hard to do, but that’s part of become a better photographer – being able to make that choice. But if you have a hard time narrowing down your shots, I’ve found some new culling articles linked up below; to see other articles I’ve shared, visit Week 12’s post.

How to Choose Your Best Images
Culling Photos: Five Tips to Choose Your Best Images
Culling Photos – Choosing Your Best Photos

Last week’s photo: Intersecting Lines #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 24: Intersecting Lines | 2018 Project 52

I knew I was going to have to take a photo walk for this week’s theme… because I had no ideas. Luckily the urban setting around the office is super helpful when it comes to lines and composition challenges! So I set out after work, after the rain had stopped (which has become one of my favorite times to take pictures) and took myself on a little detour to my car.

intersecting lines

Settings: f/2.8, 1/500 sec, 24mm, ISO 2500
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

I ended up with a few photos I liked for intersecting lines, but this one was my favorite.

I like that it’s chains, which is a little different, and the texture they add. The out-of-focus cars that are framed in the background. The vertical parking lines, the horizontal “reserved” lines, the columns… there’s a lot going on here but all of the lines still draw your eye to the center of the image.

I don’t usually stop up to f/2.8 these days, but I think that the extra depth of field helps here. Because the lines are the focus, they convey a stronger feeling than if I had done it in the other way or had everything in focus… it says “keep out” even though you can see in.


Week 25: Curves
due 06.20.18

Alright, friends, we have one more line challenge this month: curves.

Just like our other line challenges, a curved line will lead your viewer through your image, taking them on a journey to one subject or many. Curves can be found in nature or created by humans… think about how you’d like to push yourself this week. Take your camera for a walk, look around your house, create a still life with food, whatever your fancy is ask yourself if there’s a different way to photograph the curve after you snap a few frames.

Consider the viewer, where the curve begins and where it ends, and how it’s framed – paying attention to this composition can really create a strong image. And if you’re really up to the challenge, photograph an implied curve – your subjects are presented in a way in which a curve is implied.

Last week’s photo: Leading Lines #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!