Week 6: Layering | 2018 Project 52

I took so many amazing photos with layers the first week in Hawaii… and then we went to the Big Island where there’s a ton of lava. Not so much layering happening there, unfortunately. But while we were at the National Volcanoes Park on Hawaii island, I told Mike that we’d be upset if we didn’t hike down into a crater. Went all that way and passed up the chance to be in a crater…

… and I forgot that we had to hike up.

But luckily I found some wonderful greenery to layer into a photo of said crater.

layering

Settings: f/4.0, 1/5000 sec, 45mm, ISO 1250
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

So my layering went a step further into a framing. I really do like the framing layer here, like we’re in a jungle peering out into this large crater we just happened to stumble upon. (Ha!)

But the image itself isn’t my favorite. My ISO was rather high because I kept walking in and out of areas with lots of light to practically none – so I didn’t monitor it close enough. And because of that the exposure is a bit flat; I wish I had more contrast beyond the plants, but it wasn’t possible for me with the sun being so high in the sky (it was about 3:30p) and everything reflecting sunlight back despite it was all black.

Lava is not easy to photograph. Just like snow, it’s challenging.

But I always say you’re not going to love every photo you pick each week… but you learn from it… what could I have done differently, would it have mattered, if I got to try again, etc. Regardless of not loving the image for the layering prompt, I really do like it. Again… in the jungle. Haha! Such a great time – and many more photos to come, I promise!


Week 7: Mirror Reflection
due 02.14.18

Upping the ante this week…

Mirror reflection is a technique that’s new to me, but essentially we’re trying to reflect our environment and/or subject in some manner. Most images I’ve seen are outdoor with landscapes or buildings reflecting in water, where you can see both the original and the mirror reflection of it within the same frame. But this technique can also be created with a mirror itself.

Let’s explore this theme this week and see what we can share. Write down your ideas and really try to push your creativity this week. Get weird! And for a little help, below are some links to help with inspiration.

How to Photograph Reflections in Water
44 Impressive Examples of Reflection Photography
25 Stunning Reflection Photos

Last week’s photo: Winter #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 5: Winter | 2018 Project 52

So I missed posting my picture last week because… wait for it… WE WERE IN HAWAII!

Fantastic vacation exploring everything with Mike. And I took my winter photo the first Saturday we were there, on Oahu visiting several beaches around the island. Because what’s a better way of spending winter than in a place that’s beautiful and warm?

This was how I spent 10 glorious days of my vacation:

Hawaii winter

Settings: f/4.0, 1/2500 sec, 24mm, ISO 200
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

So I didn’t spend our vacation like this: my butt was not in the sand. But the weather was AMAZING. More humid than I expected, but I’ll take a comfortable high 70s/low 80s any day of the year.

We were actually all over the island, two islands really, staying busy and exploring as much as possible. Hiking mountains, snorkeling in the sea, walking everywhere, visiting monuments… it was all so, so great. We got home just last night and this is the first time I’ve been able to download my images. So many to go through… but this picture is the perfect representation of how we’ve spent the last week and a half. And I have so many images to share! But this is what I have so far. And I’ll be on schedule tomorrow with Week 6 – thanks for being patient with me!


Week 6: Layering
due 02.07.18

So Week 6 is “due” tomorrow. I posted the prompt in our 2018P52 Flickr group because most folks are following and checking in there. But in case you missed it and want to catch up…

Layering is one of my favorite compositions in photography and one that documentary photographers use often. It allows the photographer to play with their environment, tell a better story of the subject… that additional depth lets you and the viewer explore a bit more. And a little goes a long way.

Think of ways to add layers to your image this week. Move yourself around your subject and environment, trying different perspectives. I’ve included some links below to help us understand layering more and for inspiration.

Composition: Layering
Bring Depth to Your Pictures: Layering
Street Photography Composition: Layering

Last week’s photo: Intentions #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 4: Intentions | 2018 Project 52

The last three weeks have been AWESOME. I’ve been very happy with my own photographs, I’ve loved seeing what everyone’s added to our 2018P52 Flickr group… I was bound to lose my momentum though. Gah.

I had ZERO ideas. OK, that’s a lie. I had ideas. But there were all uninspiring and nothing turned out the way I wanted it to and I eventually ran out of time. Not how I like to spend my week, but here I am trying to work with what I’ve got. But at least what I’ve got is a 2018 goal for myself.

yoga intentions

Settings: f/4.0, 1/125 sec, 35mm, ISO 640
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Canon EF35mm f/1.4L USM

Yoga. I actually started practicing at home back in November 2017 and I fell in love with it. I found some YouTube videos I really liked, I had the guided help from a friend that started a beginner program and a pose library… and it’s been great. I intend to keep up with my at-home practice throughout the year and next month I want to go to a class. (I don’t think that will be a habit though. I really like doing it alone at home.) Even in two months I’ve surprised myself how much change I’ve seen. I’m stronger, I feel calmer and more balanced through the day, my posture is better… all from stretching and not breaking a sweat. I’m better at meditating now, I find myself taking small breaks throughout the day to stretch and release… yoga is awesome for me.

A few weeks ago I stuck a side plank. I was SO surprised (and excited!), that I called my husband into the room to see me because I couldn’t even figure out how to move into the pose the week before. My side plank is far from perfect; my body isn’t straight, the front of my core is a little too forward, my right arm is over-extended to help me balance, but by golly I can get myself up there! And it felt great. So I tried it again for my picture. I chose this one because of my smile – that is actual joy of finding this strength and making it happen. And all that messy yoga hair. ;)


Week 5: Winter
due 01.31.18

A suggestion from my friends at the office that are playing along, we’re going to visit the seasons throughout this year. With it being cold in the Northern hemisphere in January, we’re going to start with winter. So wherever you are, photograph what winter looks like for you. Venture outside, stay inside, get cozy, make us jealous of warmer weather… whatever the winter season means to you. Explore your perspective, play with light and shoot with your heart.

Also, I’m likely going to miss my blog post next week due to travel, so Week 6 will also be posted in the 2018 P52 Flickr group discussions. Thank you for understanding!

Last week’s photo: Intentional Camera Movement (ICM) #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 3: Intentional Camera Movement (ICM) | 2018 Project 52

Intentional camera movement is a photography effect that any level of photographer can experiment with. You might not know what your settings should be or how your subject will photograph, but the results can be pretty cool. I had a few ideas this week to try out. I pulled my colorful straws out again, made some interesting shapes with paper… but I totally stayed indoors. I had plans to go outside but it is toooooo cooooold. And with snow actually on the ground, I wimped out. But luckily I had more inspiration thanks to the husband staying busy inside with me.

intentional camera movement

Settings: f/10, 1.3 sec, 46mm, ISO 100
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

That, my friends, is sorted piles of puzzle pieces. I tried varying shutter speeds, different movements, and two images made me stop in my tracks. One was darker, bolder, not as whimsical. And this one.. softer, movement more evident, more ethereal. The colors blend into each other in such a way that I have to look at each part of the image separately, and then step back again to see it together.

I know this image or this type of photography isn’t for everyone, but I really love trying new things… and you really can’t fail with intentional camera movement. It’s about both the process and the finished product, which is a double with for photographers.


Week 4: Intentions
due 01.24.18

With a New Year comes resolutions… but I’m not one for resolutions. I make a list of recommendations for myself. But whatever you call them, they are all intentions. An act or instance in determining mentally upon some action or result.

With a few weeks behind us now, share with us some intentions you hope for this year, have already started on or maybe have already given up. What’s the best way to photograph this intention? Should you find your way in front of the camera again, or maybe show us your point of view. Or maybe try a still life. Anything works this week, but find a way to get creative when showing us your goals for the year.

Last week’s photo: Circle #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!

Week 2: Circle | 2018 Project 52

Entering Week 2 has got me all kinds of excited! I have LOVED going through our 2018P52 Flickr group to see everyone’s self-portraits – we have a good group starting out strong and I can’t wait to see how everyone interprets the weeks to come!

So… Week 2… I had so many ideas for circle. And that’s probably because it’s a very generic and general prompt, but writing my ideas down allowed me to think about the “how” a bit more and see if I could experiment. This is something I want to do more of.

I used to do it all the time way back in 2009 when I hosted my first Project 52, but not so much these days… but one of my New Year recommendations for myself is “to make art – intentionally or accidentally.” Bouncing these ideas around will push me creatively, I know it will. And I even started a new book this week that was recommended to me by a friend called Art and Fear. But… I’m getting lost in my head. This is my circle picture:

circle

 

Settings: f/4.0, 160 sec, 70mm, ISO 500
Camera and Lens: Canon EOS 5D Mark III with Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8

I watched part of a workshop led by photographer Brooke Shaden over the summer and one thing she encourages others to “teach yourself to evolve.” Revisit an old picture, critique yourself and recreate it. So that’s what I did this week. My old picture was from 2010. I knew that straws could be a cool way to find my circle, so I thought about the execution of what I was wanting. I knew bright colors were a must and thought that backlighting would make it even more interesting, so I pulled out my light board. I tried a few different things; some where the straws were close together and look like a circle themselves, then more relaxed, and I changed up my depth a field and my focal points to see what I capture differently.

And voila! This was my favorite out of my series. More of the color could be seen, I liked how the straws fell unevenly versus being bunched together, and even after getting the photo in Lightroom, I cropped the image to use the rule of thirds. I really like how it’s “bursting” into the camera and how clean the background turned out. It’s a bit abstract, it’s colorful and it makes me smile.


Week 3: Intentional Camera Movement (ICM)
due 01.17.18

In Week 3 we’re going to experiment with some intentional camera movement (ICM), or as I sometimes call it, shutter painting. This is an effect I learned in 2016 and I loved it so much that I find a way to experiment with every few weeks. It allows you to take a normal subject that’s recognizable and then blur it in a way that creates interest for the viewer. The photographer is intentionally moving their camera in a way that outcome looks as if it could have been painted. One photographer that does this very well is Erik Malm; he does intentional camera movement with his ocean scenes and they are just beautiful. Three of my favorite shutter painting images I’ve taken are this sunset, this sunflower and this abstract photo from just a few weeks ago.

To paint with your shutter, you have slow your shutter speed down. A lot. In my images that I linked above, I had shutter slowed to 0.3 seconds, 0.4 seconds and 3.2 seconds. So lower your ISO to 100, set your aperture and see how you can control the shutter speed; if you need it slower just stop down your aperture. Depending on your subject, you may move you camera differently. If your subject is still, you could drag your camera up or down to see how it paints. Or move it side to side. If your subject is moving, try panning your camera at the same speed so that the subject stays in focus while the background blurs.

This week’s prompt is here to make us think and try something new, so just start shooting – you may surprise yourself with you walk away with! I’ve included some links below that go into more detail about intentional camera movement and might give you some inspiration:
Mastering the Art of Intentional Camera Movement
Creative Landscape Shots Using Intentional Camera Movement
Outstanding Intentional Camera Movement Images

Last week’s photo: Self-portrait #2018P52

If you post your images on Instagram or any other social media, use the hashtag #2018P52 so that we can find your work and share some hearts!
Have questions about 2018 Project 52? You can find more about it here or in the 2018P52 Flickr group description. Join us any time with any camera!